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Another strategy was to reinsert the speculative unknown into the very heart of scientific processes.But just because we have mined myth for magic—and, remember, even what we define as myth would have been called religion two millennia early (and the very fact that we think those two terms equivalent is also cultural)—does not mean that this fills the same need for wonder elsewhere.For films like Avatar and The Hobbit, foreign sales equal or exceed domestic U. The list of those markets reads like the attendees of a G-8 summit (plus some key trading partners): the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Spain, South Korea, Russia, Australia, and China.Avatar (2009) set the high-water mark for India, where South Asian audiences purchased million worth of tickets—about 10 percent of foreign ticket sales worldwide.The simplest conclusion to draw from this is that Bollywood doesn't produce science fiction and fantasy because Indian audiences aren't as keen on it.Local cultural production doesn't just result from economic wherewithal; desires and needs also matter. This sometimes feels hard to accept because desires and needs feel so natural.But for most science fiction, countries with smaller GDPs than India (Australia, Mexico, South Korea) are higher consumers.Of Avengers' (2012) 8 million worldwide, million came from India; Iron Man 3 is on track with similar numbers; and, to their credit, Indian audiences contributed a paltry .8 million to Transformers 3's 4 million. The Hobbit (2012) made 4 million worldwide; it took home

Another strategy was to reinsert the speculative unknown into the very heart of scientific processes.But just because we have mined myth for magic—and, remember, even what we define as myth would have been called religion two millennia early (and the very fact that we think those two terms equivalent is also cultural)—does not mean that this fills the same need for wonder elsewhere.For films like Avatar and The Hobbit, foreign sales equal or exceed domestic U. The list of those markets reads like the attendees of a G-8 summit (plus some key trading partners): the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Spain, South Korea, Russia, Australia, and China.Avatar (2009) set the high-water mark for India, where South Asian audiences purchased $24 million worth of tickets—about 10 percent of foreign ticket sales worldwide.The simplest conclusion to draw from this is that Bollywood doesn't produce science fiction and fantasy because Indian audiences aren't as keen on it.Local cultural production doesn't just result from economic wherewithal; desires and needs also matter. This sometimes feels hard to accept because desires and needs feel so natural.But for most science fiction, countries with smaller GDPs than India (Australia, Mexico, South Korea) are higher consumers.Of Avengers' (2012) $888 million worldwide, $12 million came from India; Iron Man 3 is on track with similar numbers; and, to their credit, Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to Transformers 3's $434 million. The Hobbit (2012) made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India. Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to the $434-million worldwide gross of 'Transformers 3.' And fantasy fares much worse: In 2012, 'The Hobbit' made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India.

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Another strategy was to reinsert the speculative unknown into the very heart of scientific processes.

But just because we have mined myth for magic—and, remember, even what we define as myth would have been called religion two millennia early (and the very fact that we think those two terms equivalent is also cultural)—does not mean that this fills the same need for wonder elsewhere.

For films like Avatar and The Hobbit, foreign sales equal or exceed domestic U. The list of those markets reads like the attendees of a G-8 summit (plus some key trading partners): the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Spain, South Korea, Russia, Australia, and China.

Avatar (2009) set the high-water mark for India, where South Asian audiences purchased $24 million worth of tickets—about 10 percent of foreign ticket sales worldwide.

The simplest conclusion to draw from this is that Bollywood doesn't produce science fiction and fantasy because Indian audiences aren't as keen on it.

Local cultural production doesn't just result from economic wherewithal; desires and needs also matter. This sometimes feels hard to accept because desires and needs feel so natural.

But for most science fiction, countries with smaller GDPs than India (Australia, Mexico, South Korea) are higher consumers.

Of Avengers' (2012) $888 million worldwide, $12 million came from India; Iron Man 3 is on track with similar numbers; and, to their credit, Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to Transformers 3's $434 million. The Hobbit (2012) made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India. Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to the $434-million worldwide gross of 'Transformers 3.' And fantasy fares much worse: In 2012, 'The Hobbit' made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India.

.8 million in India. Indian audiences contributed a paltry .8 million to the 4-million worldwide gross of 'Transformers 3.' And fantasy fares much worse: In 2012, 'The Hobbit' made 4 million worldwide; it took home

Another strategy was to reinsert the speculative unknown into the very heart of scientific processes.But just because we have mined myth for magic—and, remember, even what we define as myth would have been called religion two millennia early (and the very fact that we think those two terms equivalent is also cultural)—does not mean that this fills the same need for wonder elsewhere.For films like Avatar and The Hobbit, foreign sales equal or exceed domestic U. The list of those markets reads like the attendees of a G-8 summit (plus some key trading partners): the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Spain, South Korea, Russia, Australia, and China.Avatar (2009) set the high-water mark for India, where South Asian audiences purchased $24 million worth of tickets—about 10 percent of foreign ticket sales worldwide.The simplest conclusion to draw from this is that Bollywood doesn't produce science fiction and fantasy because Indian audiences aren't as keen on it.Local cultural production doesn't just result from economic wherewithal; desires and needs also matter. This sometimes feels hard to accept because desires and needs feel so natural.But for most science fiction, countries with smaller GDPs than India (Australia, Mexico, South Korea) are higher consumers.Of Avengers' (2012) $888 million worldwide, $12 million came from India; Iron Man 3 is on track with similar numbers; and, to their credit, Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to Transformers 3's $434 million. The Hobbit (2012) made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India. Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to the $434-million worldwide gross of 'Transformers 3.' And fantasy fares much worse: In 2012, 'The Hobbit' made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India.

||

Another strategy was to reinsert the speculative unknown into the very heart of scientific processes.

But just because we have mined myth for magic—and, remember, even what we define as myth would have been called religion two millennia early (and the very fact that we think those two terms equivalent is also cultural)—does not mean that this fills the same need for wonder elsewhere.

For films like Avatar and The Hobbit, foreign sales equal or exceed domestic U. The list of those markets reads like the attendees of a G-8 summit (plus some key trading partners): the United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Brazil, Spain, South Korea, Russia, Australia, and China.

Avatar (2009) set the high-water mark for India, where South Asian audiences purchased $24 million worth of tickets—about 10 percent of foreign ticket sales worldwide.

The simplest conclusion to draw from this is that Bollywood doesn't produce science fiction and fantasy because Indian audiences aren't as keen on it.

Local cultural production doesn't just result from economic wherewithal; desires and needs also matter. This sometimes feels hard to accept because desires and needs feel so natural.

But for most science fiction, countries with smaller GDPs than India (Australia, Mexico, South Korea) are higher consumers.

Of Avengers' (2012) $888 million worldwide, $12 million came from India; Iron Man 3 is on track with similar numbers; and, to their credit, Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to Transformers 3's $434 million. The Hobbit (2012) made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India. Indian audiences contributed a paltry $2.8 million to the $434-million worldwide gross of 'Transformers 3.' And fantasy fares much worse: In 2012, 'The Hobbit' made $714 million worldwide; it took home $1.8 million in India.

.8 million in India.

Weber posited that because of modern science, a rise in secularism, an impersonal market economy, and government administered through bureaucracies rather than bonds of loyalty, Western societies perceived the world as knowably rational and systematic, leading to a widespread loss of a sense of wonder and magic.

American films in those genres make much of their profits abroad, but they tend to underperform in front of Indian audiences.

This isn't to say that there aren't folk tales with magic and mythology in India. That makes their absence in Bollywood and their overabundance in Hollywood all the more remarkable.

Cultural differences are fascinating because even as we learn about others, we learn about ourselves.

As an anthropologist, I want to flip this conversation: Why are we so into science fiction and fantasy?

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Whereas Bollywood takes quotidian family dramas and imbues them with spectacular tales of love and wealth found-lost-regained amidst the pageantry of choreographed dance pieces, Hollywood goes to the supernatural and futurism.